Hi Bernie, actually time plays 3rd priority position to how you get customers to open your email. #1 is the message - what are you saying to get them to open the email?- on the subject line. #2 is making sure the content gives your customer information and opportunities that engage them into action. #3 is the day or time of day. Then as some have mentioned.. TEST! Be prepared to try different messages and times to see what resonates with your audience. Make sure to choose a service...
Robly's OpenGen technology utilizes a traditional email campaign process; however, OpenGen then resends your campaign one to 10 days later, with a different subject line to those subscribers who didn't open the first campaign. The system sends emails one at a time, at the moment subscribers are most likely to check their inboxes. The service features A/B testing, a pop-up widget to increase contacts and mobile-responsive templates. 

WhatCounts, which recently joined forces with Windsor Circle, offers email marketing software can be operated from the cloud or on your own servers. Features include a life cycle workflow builder, behavioral personalization, advanced segmentation, dynamic content, a relational database, responsive templates, campaign analytics, A/B testing and social sharing.
Data protection is another key email security concern. Inboxes often contain GBs of business-critical and personal data, so not just hackers but also legitimate marketing companies can make big money off mining email data—and this sometimes includes the very company that is providing the email service to you. Fortunately, most companies, including your hosting provider, are pretty good about keeping out of private data, but it's important to be aware of when these policies have failed. Security breaches are commonplace and it's important to know how your data is being managed. To protect yourself, be sure to inquire about data safety capabilities on the provider's side, especially around encryption and malware scanning. But be sure to implement additional measures on your side, as well, including encryption for those using local email clients as well as deploying personal virtual private networks (VPNs) to folks accessing their email from multiple locations.
Obviously, it takes more work to create and place guest posts, but it’s worth it if the publication is aligned and authoritative. We found a way to create additional value with this as well by working with internal HubSpot experts who wanted to get their thoughts out on a given subject. For example, here’s a guest post that Blake Toder wrote for the Usabilla blog:
"I have been using 10DollarSoloAds for several of my online businesses. Every time the customer service has been exceptional. They help me write ads, re-write ads I have written and make sure that everything is running smoothly. On top of that, I receive far better results from this solo ad company than I from any other that I have used. This is absolutely worth every penny."
Monitoring the popularity and usefulness of email tools is important. As the industry changes and different trends emerge, you want to stay on top of what your customers want. If you run an extremely small business with a subscriber list of 200 people, automation might not be for you. You might benefit more from very personal email campaigns that engage those people, while larger businesses with thousands of subscribers might see better results from automated emails. As the industry changes, it's important to understand how your business works and that some tools might not make sense for your business. Don't jump on every email marketing trend.

Robly's OpenGen technology utilizes a traditional email campaign process; however, OpenGen then resends your campaign one to 10 days later, with a different subject line to those subscribers who didn't open the first campaign. The system sends emails one at a time, at the moment subscribers are most likely to check their inboxes. The service features A/B testing, a pop-up widget to increase contacts and mobile-responsive templates.

For email, security starts with spam, otherwise known as unsolicited email. This is often the bane of not only those who live in their email inboxes,but also of the IT administrators who manage email services. The good news is that spam filters are getting better every day and email providers tend to deploy the very latest and greatest for their customers. The bad news is that these filters still aren't perfect, which means they can catch a lot of "good" email but often vary significantly in effectiveness. Today's spam filters are based largely on machine learning (ML) as the primary method of determining what's bound for the trash bin. Given that ML gets more effective over time, it is no surprise that the services that have been around the longest tend to have better spam detection.

Office Autopilot plans all start at above $200 a month. These are the top 10 autoresponder and email marketing tools on the market today. You have options all the way from free to several hundred dollars a month, from basic functionality to complex analytics and shopping cart integration. The one you pick depends entirely on where your business is and what it needs.
The Pro plan, which can have three users at a time, starts at $49 for up to 5,000 subscribers, while the Max plan starts at $165 per month for up to 10,000 subscribers. Committing to one year of service lowers prices by 18 percent, with a two-year commitment bringing them down 30 percent. iContact also offers the Enterprise plan, which supports up to 100,000 contacts. You'll need to contact the company to schedule a demo and obtain a personalized price quote.
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